Q&A with Blogger Priscilla Hedlin

Blog site: WheelchairMommy.com

 

How long have you been blogging? I started blogging before it was blogging. I had my first website in 1999 on a geocities site.

Priscilla Hedlin - Interview

Describe yourself in 3 words. Devoted, resourceful and passionate

 

First thing you do when you wake up? Drink coffee and check my email.

 

Last thing you do before you go to bed? I kiss my husband, you should ALWAYS kiss goodnight!

 

Last book you read? Somewhere with You by Britney King.

 

Finish these sentences:

In the next 10 years I really hope… to see my boys growing into amazing young men and to be successful in my speaking goals.

If no one read my blog I would…be sad. I am thrilled when someone says it has inspired them but it’s for me too, so I wouldn’t stop!

Visit my blog if you….want to see how I can take care of 3 boys sitting on my butt all day.

I would be very rich if I had a dime for every time someone asked me…to stop speeding in that thing.

I get happy when I….see my boys succeed and reach their goals.

Q&A with Jamie Goodwin

Blogging via Facebook.com/Wheelin’ Weightloss

Why did you start blogging?

I started writing and sharing my story to inspire others to lose weight and to have accountability partners in return.

 Jamie Goodwin - Interviwe

   If you could give your page a permanent hashtag what would it be?  
#noexcueshere
 

 

 

 

Gadget/”trick” you use that makes life in a wheelchair a little easier?

Ask for help. People are always willing to help.

What would your followers be surprised to learn about you?

I grew up on a farm and milked goats until I was 12 years old.

Finish these sentences:

I wouldn’t have believed you if you told me ten years ago that…. I would be the mom of 3 boys and a pastor’s wife!

In the next 10 years I really hope… To have reached my goal weight (45 more pounds to go) and to have written a book.

If no one read my blog/posts I would… keep posting! Seeing my progress and setbacks always help when you are on a weight loss journey like this.

Visit my blog/page if you….want to be inspired to lose weight and get healthy!

I get happy when I… go camping with my husband and 3 boys!

ROHO Elite Interview: John McRoberts

October 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Feature Story, Lifestyle, Sports

John McRoberts - Elite LiveRoho

Meet John McRoberts, a medal-winning Paralympic Sailor for Canada. John splits time between Victoria, British Columbia and St. Petersburg, FL. Always an active person, John participated in everything from wheelchair rugby to racing before finally settling on sailing. To John sailing has longevity, “Other sports have a shelf life because of your age. Sailing can be done until the day I die.”

Disability or Age Doesn’t Matter

Unlike other sports that require being able to move a wheelchair around aggressively or upper-body strength, John points out that with sailing disability or age doesn’t matter, it’s mentality. “The beauty of sailing is that you can compete with a high level disability. Anybody can do this. [On the water] it’s about being faster and smarter – it doesn’t matter about the chair. I get to leave my chair behind. It’s really good mentally to be free from it, you know?”

Training

As part of John’s training he spends time both on the water and in the gym. Four days a week he spends 3 hours on the water practicing. At the gym John is stretching and working with a trainer on machines.

Paralympic Sports

We asked John if he weren’t sailing, what Paralympic sport would he want to compete in? “Rugby. I played when I was younger but since then the chairs have evolved; the whole sport has evolved. Rugby is the ticket everyone wants at the games.”

Security is Peace of Mind

John is equipped with a ROHO cushion both in his chair and on his boat. “You can be as talented and adventurous as you want but if your health isn’t good you can’t do anything. Sitting on a ROHO is a huge peace of mind. I know I’m going to be fine. It allows me to check off one of those precautionary things that I have to worry about each day. It’s my security blanket. “

The Future

After meeting John his wife Jackie sailing, they got married in 2010.  Jackie also enjoys staying active and is John’s sailing partner.  Together they are committed to going to the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.  Best of luck!

Is It Time To Replace Your Cushion?

February 12, 2013 by  
Filed under Guest Bloggers, ROHO Community News, ROHO Products

Guest blog post by Bob Vogel

“How do I know when it’s time to replace my cushion?” This is an important question that frequently comes up at consumer shows, a question that has a several answers.

The first and foremost reason to replace your cushion is if you have a change of medical condition that effects your skin such as weight gain, weight loss or if the cushion you are on is showing signs that it isn’t doing an effective job protecting your skin— if you start to notice your skin remaining red after a long day of sitting–insurance should pay for a new cushion with the proper seating evaluation.

This is why it is crucial to check the skin on your butt with a mirror every evening and morning—taking a few moments to do a mirror-skin check gives you the best odds of catching a potential skin problem early, before it progresses into a serious pressure ulcer.  If you start seeing a red area at the end of the day, it is important to tell your doctor and ask for a referral for an evaluation with a seating clinician—as soon as possible. Don’t wait!

This recently happened to me.  I’m 52 and in my 27th year as a T10 paraplegic and except for one tiny pressure ulcer right out of rehab I’ve had healthy skin.  But as we age our skin gets thinner. Lately I’ve noticed some redness on my left ischium during my evening mirror checks. I have a pelvic obliquity; my left ischium is slightly lower than my right. I tried readjusting the pressure in my cushion and doing extra weight shifts but the redness would return by evening. Although the redness blanched—turned white when I pushed on it with a finger and would disappear within 30 minutes– I knew I shouldn’t have any redness at all.

I took this very seriously. I know way too many wheelers that “never have skin issues” and felt they didn’t need to do mirror skin checks anymore.  Then somewhere 15 or more years after their injury they end up with a pressure ulcer, skin flap surgery and 3-month hospital stay.

The usual protocol in my case would be to phone my physician right away and get a referral to the first possible seating clinic. AND have the doctor emphasize, “there is compromised skin”.  This should get a timely seating clinic appointment because a new, properly fitted cushion is much cheaper than hospitalization and a skin flap.   If the seating clinic determined the cushion I was currently on was not adequate and I needed a new cushion, I would be sure to have them write that my skin is “compromised” on the Letter Of Medical Necessity.  As always it is important that the Letter Of Medical Necessity and cushion prescription say the exact seating needs; for example, ROHO® HIGH PROFILE® Single Compartment Cushion (4-inch).

I went through this once—26 years ago—with a tiny pressure ulcer due to the wrong cushion.  Because of the pressure ulcer I got a timely appointment at a seating clinic and Medicaid quickly approved payment for a ROHO cushion–an upgrade from the inadequate memory foam cushion on which I had been sent home from rehab.

In my current instance I was fortunate that I know a physical therapist that is an expert in seating and positioning. She took all of my seating information into account and suggested I switch to a ROHO® QUADTRO SELECT® HIGH PROFILE® Cushion, that has deeper cells than the ROHO QUADTRO SELECT that I was currently on. This would give me deeper immersion sinking into the cushion to provide more support in the areas surrounding my ischiums, and allow me additional depth to adjust the cushion so the left rear quadrant is significantly lower than the right without bottoming out—thus taking weight off of my ischium.  A disclaimer: Since I am in the ROHO elite program I didn’t have to get insurance approval.  Several weeks ago I received my ROHO HIGH PROFILE QUADTRO SELECT.  Evening mirror skin checks reveal success!  At the end of a long day my skin looks fine!

Another important reason to get a new cushion is time.  Every brand, make and model of cushion will break down over time. When this happens the cushion no longer supports and protects your skin the way it was designed—putting you at risk of a pressure ulcer.  Even if the cushion you are using is working fine, it is important to replace it before it starts to break down!

How often funding sources will reimburse a new cushion varies from one type of insurance to another.

In order to get a new cushion before your current cushion breaks down it is important that you are the squeaky wheel and ask about getting a replacement cushion. The way to do this is contact your local DME (durable medical equipment) supplier and tell them you need a new cushion. They will be happy to guide you through the step by step process of getting a new cushion, based on your seating needs, including gathering your insurance information to let you know how often your insurance will reimburse a new cushion.

If you don’t already have a working relationship with a DME supplier, locating one is your next step. ROHO makes this easy. To find a DME supplier go to www.therohogroup.com/where_to_buy.jsp and click on Buy from an Authorized Retailer Near You.

You can find Medicare DME provider(s) in your area by going to www.medicare.gov. On the main page pull down Resource Locator, scroll down to Medicare Supplier Directory, from there, type in your zip code and click submit. On the next page check Wheelchair Seating/Cushions and hit view results. The “default” setting on View Results is 10 miles — to find more DME supplier options it is helpful to expand the View All Suppliers Within (on the right side of the page) to a larger distance in order to find a Medicare DME provider that is also a ROHO authorized retailer.

It’s much better to be a proactive “squeaky wheel” and work on getting a replacement cushion while the cushion you are sitting on still provides proper support for your skin than waiting too long and risk developing a pressure ulcer because your cushion gets so old it is breaking down.  Plus, getting a new cushion while your old cushion still provides proper support means you now have a back up cushion—one you can use while cleaning your new cushion and/or to use on the seat of your car for extra skin protection while driving.  If your cushion is getting replaced, be sure that all of your paperwork specifies the exact manufacturer, model and size of the cushion you were fitted for.

Keep doing daily mirror skin checks and replace your cushion before it breaks down.  Stay healthy my friends!

 

___________________________________________

Bob VogelBob Vogel, 51, is a freelance writer for the ROHO Community blog. He is a dedicated dad, adventure athlete and journalist. Bob is in his 26th year as a T10 complete para. For the past two decades he has written for New Mobility magazine and is now their Senior Correspondent. He often seeks insight and perspective from his 10-year-old daughter, Sarah, and Schatzie, his 9-year-old German Shepherd service dog. The views and opinions expressed in this blog post are those of Bob Vogel and do not necessarily reflect the views of The ROHO Group. You can contact Bob Vogel by email at online.relations@therohogroup.com.

Monica Bascio Balances Family Life and Career in Her Quest for Paralympic Gold in London

July 19, 2012 by  
Filed under Feature Story, Guest Bloggers, Lifestyle, Sports

Monica Bascio on her way to victory in a hand cycling road race.Guest blog post by Bob Vogel

Monica Bascio will be representing the U.S. in handcycling time trial and road race events in the upcoming 2012 Paralympic Games in London that kicks off in six weeks. For Bascio, 42, handcycling in the Paralympics is the culmination of a 14-year journey of dedication and hard work. Bascio is a natural athlete and extremely competitive, however sports is just one aspect of her multi-faceted life—she is the proud mom of her 5-year-old son, Henry, dedicated wife with her husband, Ian, and an Occupational Therapist specializing in geriatrics.

Bascio became a T12 paraplegic in 1992 as a result of a skiing accident.  Following SCI rehab she pursued a degree in Occupational Therapy.  She got her first handcycle in 1997 as a way to stay fit and enjoy the outdoors with Ian, a former bike racer, and quickly developed a passion for the sport.

Bascio started handcycle racing in 1998 and was ranked the number one handcyclist in the world over the next five years, winning more that 30 handcycle races. In 2004 handcycling made its debut as a Paralympic sport in Athens, Greece, but unfortunately there was no women’s division–a huge disappointment for Bascio, who was arguably the top woman handcyclist at the time.

Undeterred, Bascio decided to try adaptive cross-country skiing (sit skiing). Once again her natural athletic ability, competitive nature and work ethic enabled her to quickly rise through the competitive ranks earning her a six-year run on the U.S. ski team where she represented the U.S. as a cross-country sit skier in the 2006 and 2010 Paralympic Winter Games.

In the off-season Bascio continued handcycling as a form of cross-training.

Bascio took much of 2007 off from competing in order to embark on a new adventure. On July 8 of that year, she gave birth to her son Henry and she and Ian proudly adapted to the world of parenthood.  By early 2008 Bascio was ready to start competing and the family created a balance of parenting, work and training that would enable Bascio to get back into ski racing.

Around the same time, Bascio’s dream of Paralympic handcycling seemed like it would come to fruition when it was announced that women’s handcycling would become an event at the 1998 summer Paralympics in Beijing.  Unfortunately in March she broke her tibia and fibula transferring out of a team van while at cross country race in Norway. Although her leg healed in time for her to compete in the Paralympic trials, she didn’t have enough time to get back into racing form and didn’t make the team.

After competing in the 2010 winter Paralympics in Vancouver, Bascio considered retiring from competition, but a rule change added an H3 class to the Paralympics. This meant she would be racing against athletes with similar function rather than an open class. Bascio quickly set her sights on the London Paralympics with the family agreeing to take it “One race at a time.”

Motherhood, family life, work and training at an elite level requires amazing balance and dedication. “On a typical day I’m up at 6:00am to put in a solid 3-hour workout on my handcycle. On some days it is a 4-hour workout.  In the meantime, Ian makes breakfast for Henry and gets him ready for the day.”  She says.  “By around 10:00am, I’m home. Ian heads to the office and I take over watching Henry and maintaining the housework.  We take turns making dinners.  Ian and I chuckle because most of our dinner conversation revolves around my training.”  Ian watches Henry on the days Bascio is working as an OT.  “The key to making it all work is we support each other, communicate and work together to balance the challenges of work, raising Henry and training for the Paralympics.”

Bascio says that although the family enjoys the hectic schedule, it can be draining.  “Ian cracks up because although I hardly ever watch TV, I love watching ‘The Biggest Looser’ (a show about weight-loss ‘boot camp’). She says. “I look at the show and think, ‘If all I had to do was stay at a campus and have a coach and do workouts all day it would be like a vacation!’”

Bascio says the other challenge in balancing family life with competition is the travel schedule. “My last trip in June was pretty crazy.  I was racing at a World Cup race in Italy for two weeks, flew back to the States, was home for two weeks, then flew to Spain to race in a World Cup race.” She says.

“Then I flew to London for 36 hours to ride the race course, then flew straight to the Nationals in Augusta, GA, and of course the plane was delayed so I didn’t get in until about 9:00pm and met Ian and Henry and Henry hadn’t seen me in so long and wanted to go swimming at the pool at the hotel, and I still had to put my bike together—then had a race the next day.”

Bascio has been an avid ROHO user for the past 15 years.  “I love ROHOs” says Bascio. “When I was first injured 20 years ago, the equipment vendor I had in rehab had the ‘old school’ mentality that a ROHO cushion was for people with higher level injuries or people that already had problems with skin breakdown so they ordered a gel cushion. I didn’t like it because it was heavy and I didn’t want to take the time to massage the gel the way I was supposed to.  When it was time to order my next cushion I switched to a ROHO and I’ve been using them ever since.”

As an OT and an athlete, Bascio is aware of how quickly a pressure ulcer can happen. “I know wheelchair users that have had pressure ulcers and I’ve seen what they go through and the great length of time it takes to heal.  I’m not willing to take that risk.” she says. “When I broke my leg it cost me a spot on the Paralympics and a pressure ulcer can take much longer to heal.  I’m always sitting on a ROHO.  I use a ROHO QUADTRO SELECT LOW PROFILE on my chair and I sit on a LTV ROHO Seat Cushion in the car.  I keep an ADAPTOR Pad in my backpack for travel and use it in the tub or shower bench, or when I’m sitting on the side of a pool or sitting on the ground working on my bike.  And of course I sit on my QUADTRO SELECT on long plane flights.”

Ian and Henry, along with other members of Bascio’s family will be in London to cheer for Bascio.  “Henry gets to travel to a lot of competitions.  He has become a member of the handcycling community.  Everybody knows him and a lot of the other athletes have kids so he has friends to play with. He has his own frequent flyer card and is already on his 2nd passport.”

Says Bascio.  Proof of the saying, “The family that plays together, stays together.”race.

___________________________________________

Bob VogelBob Vogel, 51, is a freelance writer for the ROHO Community blog. He is a dedicated dad, adventure athlete and journalist. Bob is in his 26th year as a T10 complete para. For the past two decades he has written for New Mobility magazine and is now their Senior Correspondent. He often seeks insight and perspective from his 10-year-old daughter, Sarah, and Schatzie, his 9-year-old German Shepherd service dog. The views and opinions expressed in this blog post are those of Bob Vogel and do not necessarily reflect the views of The ROHO Group. You can contact Bob Vogel by email at online.relations@therohogroup.com.

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