Is It Time To Replace Your Cushion?

February 12, 2013 by  
Filed under Guest Bloggers, ROHO Community News, ROHO Products

Guest blog post by Bob Vogel

“How do I know when it’s time to replace my cushion?” This is an important question that frequently comes up at consumer shows, a question that has a several answers.

The first and foremost reason to replace your cushion is if you have a change of medical condition that effects your skin such as weight gain, weight loss or if the cushion you are on is showing signs that it isn’t doing an effective job protecting your skin— if you start to notice your skin remaining red after a long day of sitting–insurance should pay for a new cushion with the proper seating evaluation.

This is why it is crucial to check the skin on your butt with a mirror every evening and morning—taking a few moments to do a mirror-skin check gives you the best odds of catching a potential skin problem early, before it progresses into a serious pressure ulcer.  If you start seeing a red area at the end of the day, it is important to tell your doctor and ask for a referral for an evaluation with a seating clinician—as soon as possible. Don’t wait!

This recently happened to me.  I’m 52 and in my 27th year as a T10 paraplegic and except for one tiny pressure ulcer right out of rehab I’ve had healthy skin.  But as we age our skin gets thinner. Lately I’ve noticed some redness on my left ischium during my evening mirror checks. I have a pelvic obliquity; my left ischium is slightly lower than my right. I tried readjusting the pressure in my cushion and doing extra weight shifts but the redness would return by evening. Although the redness blanched—turned white when I pushed on it with a finger and would disappear within 30 minutes– I knew I shouldn’t have any redness at all.

I took this very seriously. I know way too many wheelers that “never have skin issues” and felt they didn’t need to do mirror skin checks anymore.  Then somewhere 15 or more years after their injury they end up with a pressure ulcer, skin flap surgery and 3-month hospital stay.

The usual protocol in my case would be to phone my physician right away and get a referral to the first possible seating clinic. AND have the doctor emphasize, “there is compromised skin”.  This should get a timely seating clinic appointment because a new, properly fitted cushion is much cheaper than hospitalization and a skin flap.   If the seating clinic determined the cushion I was currently on was not adequate and I needed a new cushion, I would be sure to have them write that my skin is “compromised” on the Letter Of Medical Necessity.  As always it is important that the Letter Of Medical Necessity and cushion prescription say the exact seating needs; for example, ROHO® HIGH PROFILE® Single Compartment Cushion (4-inch).

I went through this once—26 years ago—with a tiny pressure ulcer due to the wrong cushion.  Because of the pressure ulcer I got a timely appointment at a seating clinic and Medicaid quickly approved payment for a ROHO cushion–an upgrade from the inadequate memory foam cushion on which I had been sent home from rehab.

In my current instance I was fortunate that I know a physical therapist that is an expert in seating and positioning. She took all of my seating information into account and suggested I switch to a ROHO® QUADTRO SELECT® HIGH PROFILE® Cushion, that has deeper cells than the ROHO QUADTRO SELECT that I was currently on. This would give me deeper immersion sinking into the cushion to provide more support in the areas surrounding my ischiums, and allow me additional depth to adjust the cushion so the left rear quadrant is significantly lower than the right without bottoming out—thus taking weight off of my ischium.  A disclaimer: Since I am in the ROHO elite program I didn’t have to get insurance approval.  Several weeks ago I received my ROHO HIGH PROFILE QUADTRO SELECT.  Evening mirror skin checks reveal success!  At the end of a long day my skin looks fine!

Another important reason to get a new cushion is time.  Every brand, make and model of cushion will break down over time. When this happens the cushion no longer supports and protects your skin the way it was designed—putting you at risk of a pressure ulcer.  Even if the cushion you are using is working fine, it is important to replace it before it starts to break down!

How often funding sources will reimburse a new cushion varies from one type of insurance to another.

In order to get a new cushion before your current cushion breaks down it is important that you are the squeaky wheel and ask about getting a replacement cushion. The way to do this is contact your local DME (durable medical equipment) supplier and tell them you need a new cushion. They will be happy to guide you through the step by step process of getting a new cushion, based on your seating needs, including gathering your insurance information to let you know how often your insurance will reimburse a new cushion.

If you don’t already have a working relationship with a DME supplier, locating one is your next step. ROHO makes this easy. To find a DME supplier go to www.therohogroup.com/where_to_buy.jsp and click on Buy from an Authorized Retailer Near You.

You can find Medicare DME provider(s) in your area by going to www.medicare.gov. On the main page pull down Resource Locator, scroll down to Medicare Supplier Directory, from there, type in your zip code and click submit. On the next page check Wheelchair Seating/Cushions and hit view results. The “default” setting on View Results is 10 miles — to find more DME supplier options it is helpful to expand the View All Suppliers Within (on the right side of the page) to a larger distance in order to find a Medicare DME provider that is also a ROHO authorized retailer.

It’s much better to be a proactive “squeaky wheel” and work on getting a replacement cushion while the cushion you are sitting on still provides proper support for your skin than waiting too long and risk developing a pressure ulcer because your cushion gets so old it is breaking down.  Plus, getting a new cushion while your old cushion still provides proper support means you now have a back up cushion—one you can use while cleaning your new cushion and/or to use on the seat of your car for extra skin protection while driving.  If your cushion is getting replaced, be sure that all of your paperwork specifies the exact manufacturer, model and size of the cushion you were fitted for.

Keep doing daily mirror skin checks and replace your cushion before it breaks down.  Stay healthy my friends!

 

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Bob VogelBob Vogel, 51, is a freelance writer for the ROHO Community blog. He is a dedicated dad, adventure athlete and journalist. Bob is in his 26th year as a T10 complete para. For the past two decades he has written for New Mobility magazine and is now their Senior Correspondent. He often seeks insight and perspective from his 10-year-old daughter, Sarah, and Schatzie, his 9-year-old German Shepherd service dog. The views and opinions expressed in this blog post are those of Bob Vogel and do not necessarily reflect the views of The ROHO Group. You can contact Bob Vogel by email at online.relations@therohogroup.com.

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Comments

One Response to “Is It Time To Replace Your Cushion?”
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